Mirrorless Photo Cameras revisited, PART 2

One month and counting since beginning with my Mirrorless System. Basically I’m surprised at the camera’s ability to capture street scenes if left to it’s own device. It boosts the ISO up and catches the moment – fast.

But, for nature, I’m still figuring it out. The detail is incredible and as I’m still using the kit lenses I should be pleased. Here’s what I have so far…

Barbers Orchard: Sony a6000 w/ 16-50mm variable Kit lens, 3:38 PM f/11, 1/80 sec. matrix metering, hand held
Barbers Orchard: Sony a6000 w/ 16-50mm variable Kit lens, 3:38 PM f/11, 1/80 sec. matrix metering, hand held

Given that this is hand held, not a great idea if doing serious stuff, I think it is pretty amazing.

Bee on Daisey: Sony a6000 w/Adapter and Nikon 300mm Lens, f/4.5, 1/640 sec. spot metering.
Bee on Daisy: Sony a6000 w/Adapter and Nikon 300mm Lens, f/4.5, 1/640 sec. spot metering. Tripod

This next one is a close study but I am using a very excellent pro lens with an adapter. So, I’m working on that kind of set up, but I think this is pretty sharp.

Meat Platter: Sony a6000 w 16-50mm varible kit lens, f/16, 1/160 sec, Aperture Priority Center weighted metering, 0EV
Meat Platter: Sony a6000 w 16-50mm variable kit lens, f/16, 1/160 sec, Aperture Priority Center weighted metering, 0EV

This next one is a product shot, hand held, and I’m OK with it…

And the final one in this series is a water fall.

Looking Glass Falls: Sony a6000 w 16-50mm varible kit lens set at f.28, f/2.5 sec. Aperture Priority, center weighted metering
Looking Glass Falls: Sony a6000 w 16-50mm variable kit lens set at f.28, f/2.5 sec. Aperture Priority, center weighted metering

As usual please fee free to make comments…

 

 

 

______________________________________________

PART  2

HERE ARE THE CAVEATS…

Good photo practices should not be abandoned just because technological advancements allow us to break photographic boundaries.

Some of them are.

  • Using low ISO.
  • Using a tripod, in-lieu-of increasing the ISO.
  • Using lens hoods to reduce Lens flare.
  • Use best lenses possible.

In the examples above of Barbers Orchard, I hand held the camera for the image. I could have used a tripod and better depth-of-field practices to improve the image.

In the example above of the Looking Glass Falls, I used the kit lens 16-50mm and if looking very closely, the image is not as sharp as I would have liked. I could have used a better 18-70mm Nikon lens with the adapter to achieve a better image.

Or I could have kept my aperture to f/11 for a sharper image. This image was shot at f/28, almost three stops greater than f/11. This lens tends to go softer at settings above f/11. We should be testing the lenses we use to determine their characteristics. One way to check the sharpness of the image is to view it on the computer screen at 100% of regular size – the gauge to determine which images are publishable. If f/11 would not have achieved the “look of silkiness” of the falls, I could have used a Neutral Density filter or possibly a Polarizer.

Everyone’s goals of image quality are different. Sometimes a unique composition will trump other technical factors. That does not mean we should ignore them, especially if we’re aware of them. And as our knowledge grows, so can our photography.

Bob says, Thanks!
Bob says, Thanks!

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s