Thinking of upgrading your photo equipment — some views…

Gobler Turkey at Cataloochee Valley with Sony a6000 on tripod with 55-210mm lens at 210mm, Programed Auto, 1/160 sec., f/6.3
Gobbler Turkey at Cataloochee Valley with Sony a6000 on tripod with 55-210mm lens at 210mm, Programmed Auto, 1/160 sec., f/6.3

If you are thinking of upgrading your camera, first ask yourself, WHY? A recent discussion by Darlene prompted this piece. Her link will be at the end of our discussion.

Ask yourself, what am I shooting now and what do I plan to be doing in the future?

It may not be realistic to  expect to see a huge uptick in our work just by upgrading.

Right now, I’m working through the rigors of a new, to me, Sony a6000 Mirrorless Camera (not Full Frame). For me it’s not the most fun. I think this is a mini computer with a lens attachment.

Yellow Iris photographed with Nikon D300 and 80-200mm f/.8 lens
Yellow Iris photographed with Nikon D300 and 80-200mm f/.8 lens

It is not performing as well as, well, my old friendly camera and super f2.8 lens, that I just grab and throw on the tripod and shoot away. Friendliness has virtue. Like an old boot.

But I will stay with it. It is fantastic for Video and the stills are pretty good, different, but quite good. The turkey above was shot with it yesterday.

Should I just go to the Full Frame Nikon? It has upgraded its video feature, which I like to do. But that means adding expensive new FX lenses.

Mountain Mist, happening when weather system passes through, by Bob Grytten
Mountain Mist, happening when weather system passes through, by Bob Grytten

Part of my dilemma was that a recent unintended flurry of sales of a large very large size, 30″x 48″ print, pictured here.  It was captured with my first DSLR. That camera had only 6MP and the len used was a kit lens that I never thought was particularly sharp. When I looked back to see what I had used I was amazed.

However, when evaluating the image further, we recognize some design elements which may account for the interest in it. Notice the triangles, using the edges. There are actually four triangles if counting the top one, and of course the mist gives it some sizzle. I wasn’t consciously aware of these design elements at the time. As most of you know by now, my “mantra” is just to be there. The strongest images will appear. So, perhaps a look at what & how we’re doing what we do is in order.

I think most every relatively new camera today is pretty well sufficient to make excellent images. The rest may be up to us. Now for the most pertinent Darlene article, 7 Questions to Ask Before You Upgrade to a Full Frame Camera Body

3 comments

  1. A great post and a timely question to answer for me! I have yet to upgrade to a full frame camera. I’m hugely impressed by the Nikon D800E, but find myself asking on a fairly regular basis, as I continue to get better shots with my ‘lowly’ D5100, why? It seems great photos really do occur more often when we are fully in the moment and have taken the time to know the full capabilities of our kit, New and shiny is nice…but necessary… maybe not… yet!

    Like

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